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March 24, 2009

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IE6 Support

by in Web Development on March 24, 2009 @ 3:25 pm

With the launch of Internet Explorer 8 last week there has been a good amount of talk for support for IE6. At my company we are currently discussing the best approach that will both keep the client happy at the same time forcing people to upgrade their expectations of a browser. Some thoughts have been to charge a premium to support IE6 – whether this is a percentage of total expect hours for a project or a flat rate based on the requirements , the difference being building with IE6 in mind compared to progressive enhancements after the fact. Obviously my team has pride in our work so we most likely would be building to some extent with IE6 in mind either way.

The following stats are some questions I posted surveying a large group of people.

What do you fall under?

Response Total Percent
Developer 117 54.93%
Designer 78 36.62%
Profession (ie. PM, Director) 18 8.45%
213

What type of client do you support?

Response Total Percent
Commercial (big companies) 84 32.81%
Mom and Pop type clients 84 32.81%
Non-Profits 58 22.66%
Government 30 11.72%
256

How long will you/your group support IE6?

Response Total Percent
Umm… IE6 who? 50 24.27%
Till what seems like the end of time (or till gov’t offices update) 53 25.73%
Another 6 months, then progressive inhancements FTW 26 12.62%
Another 6 months, then not at all 24 11.65%
Another year, then progressive inhancements FTW 14 6.8%
Other Options 39 18.93%
  • Other Text
  • We only suppport it for clients that ask for it.
  • As soon as Windows 7 OS is released to the public
  • until our internal IT team drops 6
  • when full experience is needed for ie6 clients, otherwise prog. enhancement now
  • Bare minimum now (works, may not look 100% perfect) unless there is extra budget for it.
  • As long as there is a business requirement to do so
  • As long as my damn clients still have it on their desks
  • Until enough of our client’s client’s no longer use IE6.
  • unsure, our clients are often not tech savvy
  • only when target audience uses
  • We only suppport it for clients that ask for it.
  • As soon as Windows 7 OS is released to the public
  • until our internal IT team drops 6
  • when full experience is needed for ie6 clients, otherwise prog. enhancement now
  • Bare minimum now (works, may not look 100% perfect) unless there is extra budget for it.
  • As long as there is a business requirement to do so
  • As long as my damn clients still have it on their desks
  • Until enough of our client’s client’s no longer use IE6.
  • unsure, our clients are often not tech savvy
  • only when target audience uses
  • IE7.js
  • Once our IE6 usership drops below 5%
  • Depends on user agent stats to my clients’ sites
  • I detect IE6, then redirect visitor to page ‘gently’ suggesting they upgrade to a better browser (with links to Firefox, Opera, Safari, Chrome, and IE7/8)
  • Until it holds a significantly lower Market share that we can profesionaly ignore it
  • Already stopped
  • until we replace expensive legacy apps that rely on IE6 for some reason
  • Untill ie8 becomes as involved as ie6
  • until IE6 market share drops below 5%
  • We only provide basic support as a opt-in feature.
  • Till clients stop using it.
  • we get the basics working, anything else is a bonus
  • Already dropped support
  • I simply try to ignore IE6 =)
  • I can’t say. My clients still see traffic from IE6.
  • progressive inhancements FTW already
  • ceased support 1st Jan 2009
  • No more support DIE IE6!
206

If you have to support government agencies, how do you plan to tackle the IE6 issue?

Response Total Percent
Will support, but with a IE6 cost adjustment, ie. charge more 93 52.84%
Just keep doing what we do 75 42.61%
Other Options 8 4.55%
  • Other Text
  • Since I work for a govt agency I don’t really have a choice. Supposedly IE7 will be released soon but they’ve been saying that forever. Until then, its all about progressive enhancement
  • I don’t pay taxes so govt. agencies can use browsers like IE6.
  • Since I work for a govt agency I don’t really have a choice. Supposedly IE7 will be released soon but they’ve been saying that forever. Until then, its all about progressive enhancement
  • I don’t pay taxes so govt. agencies can use browsers like IE6.
  • n/a
  • IE MUST DIE!!!!!
  • I dont
176

How does having IE8 available effect your process?

Response
  • How does having IE8 available effect your process?
  • Response
  • Doesn’t
  • It makes it worse. Now we have THREE versions of IE to test in!!!
  • Not at all, just one more browser to test for.
  • It doesn’t. We don’t even have IE7 deployed across our agency.
  • definitely gives us more leverage for dropping IE6
  • not at all until mass adoption
  • We have not setup a plan yet but are planning currently
  • just another browser to debug in.Also, should be noted that IE 7 is considered ‘buggy’ and ‘unsafe’ by most corporate IT services including AOL and Time Warner
  • Not at all.
  • Hopefully it helps fight our cause for stopping IE6 support
  • It’ll just mean one more browser to test in.
  • Currently, not at all. The bigwigs at my company have yet to recognize it.
  • We’ll add X-UA-Compatible = Edge headers, and fix IE8 rendering issues that we might have ignored while it was still in beta.
  • None until the % of IE6 users drops below a certain threshold.
  • It’s just yet another browser to support. No difference.
  • It doesn’t
  • Doesn’t. The gov has IE6.
  • allows me to shame IE6 users more.
  • It complicates it—there’s now another browser to test against. It wouldn’t be such a problem if the IEs weren’t so annoyingly different from version-to-version.
  • We told IE6 to take a hike months ago. IE8’s just another browser to test.
  • One more crappy browser to deal with.
  • It doesn’t yet. We’ll use IE6 internally until 2056.I do internal web apps, and I wish we could code to more than IE6 though… it’s more of an impediment to professional development than anything else. I can only code/use other browsers outside of work.
  • Not much. If it’s truly standards compliant, then we’ll still have to use IE specific stylesheets and little hacks for users who have 7 and below.
  • Not much at all, thankfully. Just one more browser to test.
  • Afraid to see how crappy it is, can not answer that
  • We are not rolling it out until after our applications have been certified for user with them. They currently are not.
  • It makes me have to test for another fucking browser. Fuck!
  • i don’t know for now, but i’m expecting for some trouble in near future
  • it doesnt
  • Other than giving me one more browser to test in, it doesn’t.
  • We don’t get to play with it because the site is adamant that they WILL deploy IE7 (and Vista) first, just to fark everything up, instead of jumping straight to Win7 and IE8 or FF.
  • Doesn’t
  • It makes it worse. Now we have THREE versions of IE to test in!!!
  • Not at all, just one more browser to test for.
  • It doesn’t. We don’t even have IE7 deployed across our agency.
  • definitely gives us more leverage for dropping IE6
  • not at all until mass adoption
  • We have not setup a plan yet but are planning currently
  • just another browser to debug in.Also, should be noted that IE 7 is considered ‘buggy’ and ‘unsafe’ by most corporate IT services including AOL and Time Warner
  • Not at all.
  • Hopefully it helps fight our cause for stopping IE6 support
  • It’ll just mean one more browser to test in.
  • Currently, not at all. The bigwigs at my company have yet to recognize it.
  • We’ll add X-UA-Compatible = Edge headers, and fix IE8 rendering issues that we might have ignored while it was still in beta.
  • None until the % of IE6 users drops below a certain threshold.
  • It’s just yet another browser to support. No difference.
  • It doesn’t
  • Doesn’t. The gov has IE6.
  • allows me to shame IE6 users more.
  • It complicates it—there’s now another browser to test against. It wouldn’t be such a problem if the IEs weren’t so annoyingly different from version-to-version.
  • We told IE6 to take a hike months ago. IE8’s just another browser to test.
  • One more crappy browser to deal with.
  • It doesn’t yet. We’ll use IE6 internally until 2056.I do internal web apps, and I wish we could code to more than IE6 though… it’s more of an impediment to professional development than anything else. I can only code/use other browsers outside of work.
  • Not much. If it’s truly standards compliant, then we’ll still have to use IE specific stylesheets and little hacks for users who have 7 and below.
  • Not much at all, thankfully. Just one more browser to test.
  • Afraid to see how crappy it is, can not answer that
  • We are not rolling it out until after our applications have been certified for user with them. They currently are not.
  • It makes me have to test for another fucking browser. Fuck!
  • i don’t know for now, but i’m expecting for some trouble in near future
  • it doesnt
  • Other than giving me one more browser to test in, it doesn’t.
  • We don’t get to play with it because the site is adamant that they WILL deploy IE7 (and Vista) first, just to fark everything up, instead of jumping straight to Win7 and IE8 or FF.
  • Sure does!
  • Frankly it’s just another pain in the ass. It just adds another browser to test on. It’s already not a short list
  • Just one more browser to test in… :(
  • Hopefully will lead us into an age where IE6 WILL be outlawed… or something like that.
  • na
  • Not yet… but we’ll likely focus on IE7 and IE8 soon and less and less on IE6.
  • Just makes it more complicated, I guess!
  • no effect.
  • We will have to start testing in it, although the priority on the fixes will be much lower that FF, IE6/7 and Safari.
  • It doesn’t. It just came out, need to wait 6 months to a year for people to update. Still can’t use some things until even IE 7 is dead.
  • We will now check in IE8
  • just another browser to test in
  • One more browser for test
  • Sigh.
  • Just one more browser to QA and tweak for.
  • Another VM with another browser to test in… more development time.
  • As we primary design for FF, not very much.
  • Not yet.
  • It hasn’t at the moment. Will now download as IE8 is out of beta
  • Adds one more browser to test once we find a machine to put it on.
  • IE8 doesn’t affect things until it becomes more popular. Then I’ll need to add it to the list of browsers to test in.
  • First of all, it’s *affect* not ‘effect’. Effect means ‘bring about’ or ‘make happen’. (Sorry, my mom was an English teacher!).Second, the IE8 beta’s been around for what, a year now? So having the actual release doesn’t make much of a difference to my development process. Although I suppose I should pay attention now to making sure the sites I build look proper in IE8, the reality is that the vast majority of my clients’ visitors won’t be using IE8 just yet, unless Microsoft forces it down their throats via a non-optional update.
  • Until the people in charge of Corporate IT networks pull their fingers out, it makes zero difference
  • not sure yet :)
  • IE8 will continue to be the worst browser. It is less bad than IE6, however.
  • I need another desktop to test for IE8, the way I already have one just for IE7 testing…can’t do some of the fancy tricks here at work to get them up side by side
  • Still renders differntly, ie7 still seems easier to deal with
  • It lengthens the time spent on IE-fixing ¬¬
  • Doesn’t really effect it. One more browser to test in but it’s the closest to standards so far.
  • we make our website the more cross browser possible. It’s just another test we must do.
  • It doesn’t. If it’s standards-compliant, it should work fine anyway. If it’s not…DIE!!!!
  • Not right now. Many of my clients are small businesses. Main focus on IE7 and some IE6 right now. But this will change soon.
  • one more effing browser to test in. and an effing Microsoft browser no less
  • It’s just another site to test it. It also means I can push a bit farther into the realm of CSS3.
  • Nothing now as everything we do already works in 8, but hopefully it effects our clients process, getting them to upgrade from 6.
  • Just another browser to test.
  • just another browser we have to test in.
  • It’s actually a kick in the pants, but not because of IE8 itself, but rather its IE7 ‘compatibility’ mode. Since, that mode won’t render the way IE7 itself renders, it effectively adds another browser to test and support.
  • it doesn’t really yet.
  • test
  • We’ll have another browser in which to test, and another stylesheet to implement should the need arise (via conditional comments)
  • So far not at all. It seems to be working well.
  • At least it is somewhat compliant but is already behind the curve without CSS3 support. So many people that use IE don’t even know what version they are using so unless microsoft forces a change my life will still be burdened by the plagues that is know as IE. I only see a minimal change in the near term to my process.
  • it makes debugging for ie7 and 8 easier
  • Haven’t really tested in IE8. I’m fairly confident that the majority of work will be OK. Will need to look more closely at what I must do to ensure standards compliance mode.I’ve been watching site stats and I think across all the sites I manage I’ve had 2 or 3 visits from IE8
  • One more browser to test in.
  • Well. I’m hoping that with the news of IE8 some people will upgrade after realizing there has been two major versions of the browser released. In the end I hope it will keep me from spending a ton of time fixing the site for IE6.
  • Minimal
  • not sure yet
  • hmmmm. it is a microsoft product. need I really say more. I will likely have to hack on
  • It’s another browser to test again, but so far the testing process seems pretty straightforward. I expect that having implemented CSS2.1 properly will mean that it won’t impose too much change in our process. Of course, in theory.
  • Makes developing for these kind of platforms a lot easier. Less time concerning stupid errors and glitches specific to IE platform.
  • Makes more problems to deal with.
  • Doesn’t effect
  • Hope, IE6 will die.
  • Hardly at all. I mostly test in webkit and mozilla browsers then when the page is done I see if everything works okay in the IE 6-8 and include conditional stylesheets to work around the ‘bugs’.
  • Not at all. IE7 only recently became our officially supported browser. As much as I hate to say it, I don’t expect to see IE8 in our environment for some time.
  • Saves me and the client money
  • Yet another browser to test in.
  • Don’t know yet.
  • None really because it’s too new
  • Just one more browser to test on. Hopefully that slice of IE6 will keep shrinking. Is it worth testing for if it gets under 10%? Most of my clients audience has already moved on to IE7+
  • It has yet to affect us. I’m terrified when we start supporting it.
  • Still trying to sort that out.
  • it creates more work. IE8 compatibility view is not the same as a native IE7 client so now we have to work with even more cross-browser issues.
  • Doesn’t really. There have always been browser inconsistencies to deal with, with IE8 there are some more.Only in my dreams do all browsers render the same.
  • I usually use the IE7 compatibility meta tag. So, IE8 is more like a pseudo-ghost to me anyways.
  • It hasn’t so far.
  • Better than IE6!
  • No
  • not at all so far…
  • Just another rushed out browser that has to be entered into the equation and bugtested for each project
  • Ugh, just another idiot browser to maintain..

Are your sites working in IE8?

Response Total Percent
Yes 133 63.94%
No 8 3.85%
Other Options 67 32.21%
  • Other Text
  • dunno
  • most, but not all
  • Haven’t tested yet.
  • have not been actively qa’ing for ie8
  • Don’t know
  • untested
  • Haven’t tested yet.
  • Still checking
  • Have not checked
  • not sure
  • Haven’t even tested yet
  • Internal NO, External Yes
  • testing this week
  • have no ieda
  • I’ve not played with IE 8 much
  • dunno
  • most, but not all
  • Haven’t tested yet.
  • have not been actively qa’ing for ie8
  • Don’t know
  • untested
  • Haven’t tested yet.
  • Still checking
  • Have not checked
  • not sure
  • Haven’t even tested yet
  • Internal NO, External Yes
  • testing this week
  • have no ieda
  • I’ve not played with IE 8 much
  • Maybe
  • Don’t know
  • Don’t know yet
  • Haven’t checked yet ;)
  • Haven’t checked.
  • We haven’t even started testing yet.
  • Most of them, yes
  • for the most part
  • haven’t been able to test yet.
  • Untested…
  • Haven’t tested all yet.
  • not sure at the moment
  • Do not know yet.
  • Not Sure
  • not sure
  • I don’t know
  • not sure yet.
  • Haven’t checked
  • mostly
  • Everything renders larger
  • Haven’t checked yet
  • I should say not…!
  • the phone’s not ringing … yet
  • Haven’t tested yet.
  • have not check them yet.
  • Most are, using the meta tag for IE7 rendering
  • Don’t know. I would imagine most if not all will work.
  • havn
  • idk I’ll begin testing in it now
  • not sure
  • The ones I direclyt worked on, yes
  • haven’t checked
  • untested
  • Mostly, have to fix some float issues.
  • need to check
  • there are issues
208


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